Trondheim

EUROPE 15

27/06/2011

TRONDHEIM

I was packed up and on the road in good time this morning, intending to have breakfast at the first place I saw. This proved to be more challenging than I’d anticipated, and I was starving by the time I finally found an open gas station.

Having had my fill of hot rolls, juice, and coffee I set off again, heading toward Trondheim. The map made getting passed the city look simple enough, but the road I’d intended to take was closed to bikes so I had to make my way through the suburbs on minor roads. These streets had poor surfaces and were interupted with frequent road works – not ideal when you’re trying to nurse your rear wheel so as not to break another spoke! With a population of nearly 200,000 people Trondheim is Norway’s third largest city, and it was hard work to cycle through: it’s built on the hilly banks of Tronheimsfjordon, and with today’s high humidity I felt every climb.

By the time I left the city I was covered in dust from roadworks, and glad to see the back of it. However, taking the suburban route did have one advantage – I managed to find a bike shop. I hadn’t been actively for one, but it was right beside the road so I thought I’d seize the opportunity. It was more a sporting goods store than a true bike shop, but I managed to borrow some grease to re-fit my pedals which have been clicking lately.

I made good progress after Trondheim, but the E6 (the road I’m now on) is the most heavily trafficked so far, and the trucks flying passed every couple of minutes took some getting used to after the quiet roads of the north. I climbed steadily away from the coast – although the gradients were shallow, I quickly gained altitude, glimpsing high, snow-capped, mountains towards the end of the day.

After 100 miles I arrived at the campsite marked on the map – only to find that it was shut. Determined to have a shower after the grime of the city I pushed on to the next one, another 10 miles or so down the road. When you expect to stop, and have to continue the miles feel much harder, and so by the time I finished I felt exhausted, gratefully collapsing intoy tent just as it started to rain.

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